Russia may buy BrahMos cruise missiles for Su-30SM fighters — source

© Marina Lystseva/TASS

KUBINKA (Moscow region), September 7. /TASS/. The Russian military are interested in buying the BrahMos cruise missiles, which were developed jointly with India, for equipping its Sukhoi Su-30SM fighters, a military-diplomatic source told TASS on Wednesday.

“The new missile strike system – a plane plus a missile – will be first of all made operational with the Indian Air Force. After that the Russian Air Force, which is very interested, may buy the system,” the source said at the Army 2016 forum.

He added that the negotiations with the Russian side might begin in 2017 after flights tests of the Indian Su-30MKI fighters with the BrahMos missile are completed.

TASS has no official confirmation of the report.

The Indian Air Force fighter with a demonstrator of the BrahMos missile’s air-launched version performed the first flight in summer 2016. The first aircraft launches of the missile are expected to take place before the year end. India plans to equip three regiments of the Su-30MKI fighters with the updated missiles. The Indian military currently have in service the missile’s ground and sea-launched versions.

 

Russia, India may hold first aircraft launches of BrahMos missile by yearend

In late June, a modified Su-30MKI fighter jet performed its first experimental flight with a BrahMos missile demonstrator
BrahMos supersonic cruise missiles

BrahMos supersonic cruise missiles

© Ruslan Shamukov/TASS

MOSCOW, August 2. /TASS/. Russia and India may hold two launches of BrahMos cruise missiles from a Sukhoi Su-30MKI fighter jet against sea and ground targets at the end of this year, the CEO of Russia’s Research and Production Association of Machine-Building told TASS on Tuesday.

The Research and Production Association of Machine-Building is involved in the development of BrahMos cruise missiles jointly with the Indian side.

“If positive results of the work with the technologically operational missile are received, there are plans to carry out demonstration launches of two organic missiles against a sea and a ground target,” CEO of the Research and Production Association of Machine-Building Alexander Leonov said.

In late June, a modified Su-30MKI fighter jet performed its first experimental flight with a BrahMos missile demonstrator, he added.

According to Leonov, a flight with a mock-up equipped with a system of sensors confirmed the calculated data and the results of tests on scaled models in a wind tunnel.

“After fulfilling the program of flights to get operational performance readings, the so-called emergency release of the mock-up is planned to get data on the dynamics of the missile’s safe separation from the aircraft,” Leonov said.

Spokesman for the Russian-Indian joint venture BrahMos Aerospace Praveen Pathak earlier told Russian daily Izvestia that the possibility of the missile’s separation from an aircraft would be checked in August. In his estimate, the first launch of a missile from a Su-30MKI may take place in autumn.

India plans to arm three regiments of Su-30MKI fighter jets with BrahMos missiles. For this purpose, the missile has been improved: the airborne version is 500 kilograms lighter and almost half a meter shorter. BrahMos missiles are already operational with the Indian Army and Navy.

 

Russian-Indian Company to Test Su-30 Fighter Equipped With BrahMos Missile

Su-30 MKI

 

Russian-Indian joint venture BrahMos Aerospace Limited is going to test a Su-30 MKI fighter jet equipped with a BrahMos supersonic cruise missile in fall.

Russian-Indian joint venture BrahMos Aerospace Limited is going to test a Su-30 MKI fighter jet equipped with a BrahMos supersonic cruise missile in fall, the company’s spokesman Praveen Pathak told Russian media.

“In September-October we are going to hold the first practical air launch of the missile. We have already completed 90 percent of works on the complex. Our military are inspired by fire power and range capability, which will be provided by the deadly combination of the most progressive fighter and our missile,” Pathak told the Izvestiya newspaper.

He added that in order to equip the fighter with the BrahMos missile, it was necessary to make changes in the jet’s design.

The company carried out a demonstration of a Su-30 MKI fighter equipped with a BrahMos missile on June 25.

BrahMos is a short-range supersonic missile, which has been in use by the Indian Navy since 2005. The missile has a range of 180 miles and can carry a conventional warhead of up to 660 pounds.

India, Russia agree to export BrahMos to third countries

Brahmos

29 May 2016 TASS
Talks with countries like UAE, Chile, South Africa and Vietnam are in advanced stages.

India and Russia have agreed ‘in principle’ to export the world’s fastest anti-ship cruise missile, BrahMos, to third countries – the UAE, Vietnam, South Africa and Chile, Praveen Pathak, spokesman for BrahMos Aerospace – the developer of the missile, told TASS on Friday.

“The several structural changes were made in the defence exports policy and these were yielding results. As far as the BrahMos missile is concerned, talks with countries like UAE, Chile, South Africa and Vietnam are in advanced stages,” he said.

“Since Russia is the partner country in the BrahMos joint venture with its consent discussions with several other countries, including Philippines, South Korea, Algeria, Greece, Malaysia, Thailand, Egypt, Singapore, Venezuela and Bulgaria have now been taken to the next level,” he said.

 

The UAE

According to him, “BrahMos Aerospace is expected to ink the deal with UAE by the year end as both India and Russia have good relations with the country and there is conflict of interest there, hence there will no problems in exporting the missile to that country.”

Vietnam, China

“In the case of Vietnam, China has expressed its reservations against India’s policies to supply weapons. In the South China Sea, China and Vietnam are locked in a conflict over maritime boundaries. We expect that those friendly nations with whom neither India nor Russia have any conflict would be keen on buying these missiles,” he said.

BrahMos

BrahMos was developed jointly by India’s Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) and Russia’s NPO Mashinostroyenia (NPOM), which in 1998 established the company BrahMos Aerospace. The name BrahMos is a portmanteau formed from the names of two rivers, the Brahmaputra of India and the Moskva of Russia.

The BrahMos supersonic missile develops a speed of Mach 3. An upgraded model capable of reaching Mach 6 speed is currently being tested. According to BrahMos Aerospace, the missile has flight range of up to 290 km with supersonic speed all through the flight, leading to shorter flight time, consequently ensuring lower dispersion of targets, quicker engagement time and non-interception by any known weapon system in the world. It operates on ‘Fire and Forget Principle’, adopting varieties of flights on its way to the target. Its destructive power is enhanced due to large kinetic energy on impact. Its cruising altitude could be up to 15 km and terminal altitude is as low as 10 meters. It carries a conventional warhead weighing 200 to 300 kg.

Compared to existing state-of-the-art subsonic cruise missiles, BrahMos has: 3 times more velocity, 2.5 to 3 times more flight range, 3 to 4 times more seeker range, 9 times more kinetic energy. The missile has identical configuration for land, sea and sub-sea platforms and uses a Transport Launch Canister (TLC) for transportation, storage and launch.

First Export Contract for BrahMos Cruise Missiles to Be Signed in 2016

Anti-ship missile  Brahmos

 

An Asian-Pacific country will sign a contract on the delivery of Russian-Indian BrahMos cruise missiles by the end of 2016.

KUALA LUMPUR  The first export contract on delivering Russian-Indian BrahMos cruise missiles to a country in the Asian-Pacific Region will be signed by the end of 2016, BrahMos Aerospace spokesman Praveen Pathak said Wednesday.

“It’s too early to be specific since negotiations are continuing, but we plan that by the end this year there will be one solid contract,” Pathak told RIA Novosti in an interview.

He added that the Asian-Pacific nation would be a friendly nation that neither Russia nor India has any conflicts with.

First Trials of BrahMos Cruise Missiles on Su-30 Jets to Begin in 1-2 Months

The first trials of the Russian-Indian BrahMos cruise missiles on Russian Su-30 Flanker C multirole fighter jets will begin in one or two months and end in November-December 2016, Praveen Pathak said.”Ground tests of the aircraft missile have ended, now we’re planning to place it on an Su-30 and in the next month or two there will be trial launches,” Pathak told RIA Novosti.

He said that a life-sized rocket mock-up would be initially used in the tests, and then proceed with an actual BrahMos cruise missile.

“We hope that all of the tests will be complete in November-December,” Pathak added.

 

Why the BrahMos armed Sukhoi is bad news for India’s enemies

April 20, 2015 Rakesh Krishnan Simha
By successfully modifying the Su-30MKI to carry the supersonic BrahMos missile, India has signalled its intent to strike with devastating force early on in a conflict.
Why the BrahMos armed Sukhoi is bad news for India’s enemies Su-30 and BrahMos are powerful weapons. Source: wikipedia.org

India has signalled its intent to strike enemy targets with devastating force early on in a conflict.

In September 2010 India’s newly constituted tri-services Strategic Forces Command (SFC) submitted a proposal to the Defence Ministry for setting up two dedicated squadrons of aircraft comprising 40 Su-30MKI air dominance fighters. The task of this “mini air force” is to deliver nuclear weapons.

The picture became clearer in October 2012 when the Cabinet Committee on Security green lighted a programme to carry out structural and software modifications on 42 Su-30MKIs and acquire 216 air-launched BrahMos missiles. Until then, the BrahMos – the product of an India-Russia joint venture – was for exclusive use by the Navy.

In March 2015 the SFC received the first of these 42 Sukhois equipped with the air launched version of the supersonic BrahMos. This is the first time that the SFC, which at present depends on the Indian Air Force (IAF) for delivering nuclear weapons under its command, is acquiring its own aerial assets.

Currently, India’s nuclear delivery system is based on land-based ballistic missiles such as the Agni and Prithvi plus the IAF’s nuclear-capable Mirage 2000, Su-30 MKI and Jaguar fighter-bombers. The final element of the nuclear triad, submarine-launched missiles, is still being tested.

Individually, the Su-30 and BrahMos are powerful weapons. But when the world’s most capable fourth generation fighter is armed with a uniquely destructive cruise missile, together they are a dramatic force multiplier.

The BrahMos’ 3 km per second speed – literally faster than a bullet – means it hits the target with a huge amount of kinetic energy. In tests, the BrahMos has often cut warships in half and reduced ground targets to smithereens. The Sukhoi’s blistering speed will add extra launch momentum to the missile, plus the aircraft’s ability to penetrate hardened air defences means there is a greater chance for the pilot to deliver the missile on to its designated targets.

Likely targets

Considering that India’s primary enemy is Pakistan and that country’s chief backer is China, against which India has fought two conflicts – losing in 1962 and winning in 1967 – these two countries are the obvious targets.

Against Pakistan, the targets are obvious. A two-squadron attack using most of the SFC’s air assets can within minutes utterly cripple the country’s command and control centres; nuclear power plants, including the Kahuta ‘Death Star’ where the majority of the “Islamic” bombs are manufactured; the Sargodha Central Ammunition Depot west of Lahore where these warheads are stored; ballistic missile bases in Gujranwala, Okara, Multan, Jhang and Dera Nawab Shah; Pakistani Army Corp headquarters in Rawalpindi; the Karachi Port, Pakistani’s only major harbour and its Naval HQ; and ordinance factories that manufacture tanks and fighter aircraft.

The supersonic BrahMos armed with a conventional warhead can theoretically penetrate hardened command, control and communication centres. However, there is no guarantee these targets will be 100 per cent destroyed unless the BrahMos is nuclear tipped. A pre-emptive nuclear strike will therefore ensure that Pakistan’s offensive capability is effectively neutralised and it is never again a threat to India.

Against China, the Sukhoi-BrahMos one-two punch seems counter-intuitive as Chinese targets are located deep inland or on the coast. However, the Su-30MKI has a maximum range of 3000 km (extendable to 8000 km with in-flight refuelling). Now add the BrahMos’s 300 km reach and India can hit targets 3300 km inside China.

Why the Sukhoi-BrahMos option?

The Su-30MKI is an obvious choice. The SFC does not want untested fighters but the ones which can be relied upon to deliver nuclear-tipped missiles. The aircraft has a titanium airframe strong enough to fly a high-speed terrain following profile. The batch of 42 Sukhois will also have hardened electronic circuitry to shield them from the electromagnetic pulse of a nuclear blast.

Having a dedicated aircraft for the nuclear attack role offers India’s war planners strategic flexibility and increases the odds of success. Because ballistic missiles are used only as a weapon of last resort, they cannot really be deployed at will. Once released, they cannot be recalled and if shot down are not easily replaced. Fighter aircraft, on the other hand, can perform repeated sorties and be directed to bomb targets as they move. For instance, if Pakistan moves it warheads out of Sargodha depot, which is presumably under constant watch by Indian satellites, the Sukhois can be vectored against a column of Pakistani trucks transporting their nuclear cargo.

The SFC’s mini air force of 42 Sukhois can also launch their missiles against Pakistani targets from within Indian airspace or while flying over international waters, thereby complicating the enemy’s defences. It is a lot easier for India to destroy Pakistani war fighting capability because not only is Pakistan relatively smaller but it has also concentrated its defences in one province, Punjab.

Further developments

Because heavy modifications were necessary for integrating such a heavy missile onto the Su-30MKI, initially it seemed to make little sense to deploy a single missile. Aviation Week reports that initially even Sukhoi was reluctant to go along. That prompted HAL to go solo, but Aviation Week says Sukhoi came on board in 2011. The Russian side provided HAL with technical consultancy especially for the modifications to the fuselage in order to accommodate the 9-metre-long missile.

“Work is also underway on a modified lighter and smaller-diameter version of the BrahMos for deployment on the Indian navy’s MiG-29K and, potentially, the Dassault Rafale,” says Aviation Week.

And signalling the country’s immunity from western sanctions, DRDO scientists say the 300 km cap on the missile’s range will be removed. The next generation BrahMos is likely to be a longer range weapon. And with the planned increased in speed, the missile will have considerably enhanced kinetic energy despite its smaller size optimised for relatively smaller aircraft such as the MiG-29.

That’s really bad news if you are in the Sukhoi-BrahMos crosshairs.